What are the Common Phobias in Humans?

Published on: November 22, 2021 

Scared of the dreadful little creatures? Terrified of crawling snakes? Well, don’t be embarrassed, you're in good company. As indicated by the American Psychiatric Association, fears are the most well-known mental illness among women and the second generally common issue among men.

A phobia is a nonsensical fear of something that could merely harm you. The actual word comes from the Greek word Phobos, which means fear or horror. Hydrophobia, for instance, in a real sense means fear of water. At the point when somebody has a fear, they experience extraordinary fear of a specific object or event.

Phobias are a type of anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common. They’re estimated to affect more than 30 percent trusted Source of U.S. adults at some time in their lives.

In simple words, fear is an excessive, persistent, ridiculous fear of any specific object, individual, animal, event, or activity. It is a sort of anxiety disorder. There are some common types of phobias in human beings that are sometimes noticeable or overlooked.

Ophidiophobia                

Ophidiophobia is the most common type, which is fear of snakes. This fear is a common attribute to transformative causes, social impacts, or personal experiences. Some recommend that since snakes are undoubtedly poisonous, our progenitors who kept away from such risks were bound to endure and pass down their genes.

Another theory proposes that the fear of snakes and similar crawly creatures may emerge out of an inherent fear of infection, disease, and contamination. Studies have shown that these creatures will generally incite a disgust reaction, which may clarify why snake phobias are so normal, yet, individuals tend not to exhibit similar fears of dangerous creatures like lions or bears.

Cynophobia

Cynophobia, or phobia of dogs, is among the most common fears. Truth be told, 36% of all patients who are taking the fear treatment are observed for cynophobia. Much of the time, these fears come from an individual personal experience which is the event of the past. This fear has a serious effect on a person’s life, it could disturb the ability to work, focus, and function normally in the daily routine.

Social Phobia

Commonly called fear of people. Fear of being humiliated or embarrassed before others are called social phobia. In a few cases it could be experienced as the normal fear of public speaking, yet for certain individuals, this fear might reach out to something as simple as signing a check in front of a person or eating out in the open area. Social fears are also called social anxiety issues, and they influence around 15 million American adults, men, and women at the same ratio.

Trypanophobia

Trypanophobia is the fear of injections and needles. This specific fear is a difficult one. It frequently stays untreated because individuals keep away from the specific object that causes the fear. It can cause a feeling of outrageous fear when they have a forthcoming injection. Victims can likewise have an increase in heart rate, and may even get faint because of their dread or anxiety.

Nyctophobia

Most children panic due to dark, however, numerous adults do the same as well! Truth be told, around 11% of the population experiences an outrageous fear of the dark, which is also known as nyctophobia. This fear is ordinarily connected with irregular sleeping patterns. Different signs and symptoms include dry mouth, nausea, and shortness of breath. With the fear of basically not having the option to see, a nyctophobia frequently has a determined fear that something terrible will happen to them when they are in the dark.

For more information about common Phobias, visit our Mental Health Library page dedicated to Anxiety Disorders. If you would like help from our mental health team for your Anxiety Disorders, please submit an appointment request or call us at (352) 431-3940". 

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