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Can a Person Be Diagnosed with a Type of Obsessive-Compulsive or Related Disorder without Having All the Symptoms?

Yes. Other types of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders that do not include all the typical symptoms include:

  •  Body dysmorphic-like disorder with actual flaws. This is similarto body dysmorphic disorder except that the defects or flaws in physical appearance are clearly observable by others. In such cases the preoccupation with these flaws is excessive and causes significant distress or impairment.
  • Body dysmorphic-like disorder without repetitive behaviors. Symptoms are similar to body dysmorphic disorder except that the individuals do not perform repetitive behaviors or mental acts in response to the appearance concerns.
  •  Body-focused repetitive behavior disorder. This is characterized by recurrent body-focused repetitive behaviors (e.g., nail biting, lip biting, cheek chewing) and repeated attempts to decrease or stop the behaviors. The symptoms cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning, and are not better explained by another mental disorder or non-suicidal self-injury.
  •  Obsessional jealousy. This is characterized by non-delusional preoccupation with a partner’s perceived infidelity. The preoccupation may lead to repetitive behaviors or mental acts in response to the infidelity concerns. The condition causes significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning, and is not better explained by another mental disorder, such as delusional disorder, jealous type, or paranoid personality disorder.
  •  Shubo-kyofu. A Japanese culture-specific syndrome that is similar to body dysmorphic disorder and is characterized by excessive fear of having a bodily deformity.
  •  Koro syndrome. An episode of sudden and intense anxiety that the penis (or the vulva and nipples in females) will recede into the body, possibly leading to death.
  •  Jikoshu-kyofu. A Japanese culture-specific syndrome characterized by fear of having an offensive body odor, body function or appearance.
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Mental Health Library Sources:

Information included in all topics of the Mental Health Library comes from the Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria From DSM-5 and Kaplan & Sadock’s Concise Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry. Complete diagnostic and treatment information may be found within these publications.

Disclaimer:

Information within the Mental Health Library is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis purposes. Rather, it is provided as a public educational service to make people aware of mental health conditions. Please consult a qualified mental health professional for a diagnosis of any suspected mental health illness.

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